SUBARU Impreza 2.0 R (2005 – 2007)

0


The first Subaru Impreza was officially introduced in 1993 but the production of the car is still continued this year. More important, the Impresa has always been praised for its features, managing to beat the competition in multiple areas. For example, unlike its rivals, including here the Toyota Corolla, the Honda Civic, the Nissan Sentra, the Mitsubishi Lancer and the Mazda 323, Subaru’s model came with an all wheel drive which improved the car’s capabilities a lot

Cylinders
B4
Displacement
1994 cm3
Power
118 KW @ 6400 RPM
160 HP @ 6400 RPM
158 BHP @ 6400 RPM
Torque
137 lb-ft @ 3200 RPM
186 Nm @ 3200 RPM
Fuel System
Multipoint Injection
Fuel
Petrol
CO2 Emissions
214 g/km
performance
Top Speed
130 mphOR209 km/h
Acceleration 0-62 Mph (0-100 kph)
8.8 s
fuel consumption
City
18.8 mpg USOR12.5 L/100Km
Highway
33.6 mpg USOR7 L/100Km
Combined
26.1 mpg USOR9 L/100Km
transmission
Drive Type
All Wheel Drive
Gearbox
Manual, 5 Speed
brakes
Front
Ventilated Discs
Rear
Discs
tires
Tire Size
205/50 R16
dimensions
Length
175.8 inOR4465 mm
Width
68.5 inOR1740 mm
Height
56.7 inOR1440 mm
Front/rear Track
58.5/58.1 inOR1,486/1,476 mm
Wheelbase
99.4 inOR2525 mm
Ground Clearance
5.9 inOR150 mm
Cargo Volume
14.2 cuFTOR402 L
Cd
0.33
weight
Unladen Weight
2844 lbsOR1290 kg
Gross Weight Limit
3924.2 lbsOR1780 kg


MERCEDES BENZ C-Class (W205)

0


With an up to 100 kg (220 pounds) lower weight depending on the engine specification, the fourth generation of the Mercedes-Benz C-Class brings an all-new design language and a host of safety and comfort features that have been borrowed straight from the S-Class W222. Launched at the 2014 North American International Auto Show, in Detroit, the C-Class W205 is the first model in its segment to feature an electronically-controlled pneumatic suspension (Airmatic), and can be also fitted with head-up display, a low-speed autonomous driving system and variable aerodynamics, while the fuel economy has also been improved with up to 20 percent on all engines.

Cylinders
4
Displacement
1991 cm3
Power
115 KW @ 5300 RPM
156 HP @ 5300 RPM
154 BHP @ 5300 RPM
Torque
184 lb-ft @ 1200-4000 RPM
249 Nm @ 1200-4000 RPM
Fuel System
Direct Injection
Fuel
Petrol
CO2 Emissions
127 g/km
performance
Top Speed
140 mphOR225 km/h
Acceleration 0-62 Mph (0-100 kph)
8.2 s
fuel consumption
City
34.6 mpg USOR6.8 L/100Km
Highway
50 mpg USOR4.7 L/100Km
Combined
42.8 mpg USOR5.5 L/100Km
transmission
Drive Type
Rear Wheel Drive
Gearbox
6 speed manual
brakes
Front
Ventilated discs
Rear
Solid Discs
tires
Tire Size
205/60 R16
dimensions
Length
184.5 inOR4686 mm
Width
71.3 inOR1811 mm
Height
56.8 inOR1443 mm
Front/rear Track
62.5/61.8 inOR1,588/1,570 mm
Wheelbase
111.8 inOR2840 mm
Ground Clearance

Cargo Volume
17 cuFTOR481 L
Cd
0.27
weight
Unladen Weight
3075 lbsOR1395 kg
Gross Weight Limit
4321 lbsOR1960 kg

SUBARU Impreza 1.5L 2005 – 2007

0


The first Subaru Impreza was officially introduced in 1993 but the production of the car is still continued this year. More important, the Impresa has always been praised for its features, managing to beat the competition in multiple areas. For example, unlike its rivals, including here the Toyota Corolla, the Honda Civic, the Nissan Sentra, the Mitsubishi Lancer and the Mazda 323, Subaru’s model came with an all wheel drive which improved the car’s capabilities a lot

Cylinders
B4
Displacement
1493 cm3
Power
77 KW @ 6400 RPM
105 HP @ 6400 RPM
103 BHP @ 6400 RPM
Torque
105 lb-ft @ 3200 RPM
142 Nm @ 3200 RPM
Fuel System
Multipoint Injection
Fuel
Petrol
CO2 Emissions
184 g/km
performance
Top Speed
108 mphOR174 km/h
Acceleration 0-62 Mph (0-100 kph)
13.4 s
fuel consumption
City
22.6 mpg USOR10.4 L/100Km
Highway
36.7 mpg USOR6.4 L/100Km
Combined
29.8 mpg USOR7.9 L/100Km
transmission
Drive Type
All Wheel Drive
Gearbox
Manual, 5 Speed
brakes
Front
Ventilated Discs
Rear
Discs
tires
Tire Size
185/70 R14
dimensions
Length
175.8 inOR4465 mm
Width
68.5 inOR1740 mm
Height
56.7 inOR1440 mm
Front/rear Track
58.5/58.3 inOR1,486/1,481 mm
Wheelbase
99.4 inOR2525 mm
Ground Clearance
6.1 inOR155 mm
Cargo Volume
14.2 cuFTOR402 L
Cd
0.33
weight
Unladen Weight
2766.8 lbsOR1255 kg
Gross Weight Limit
3858.1 lbsOR1750 kg

Subaru Impreza (Mk3 Impreza)

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Impreza III range.
Released in September 2007 and launched as a five-door hatchback-only small car (a sedan followed in late 2008) was more spacious, better equipped, quieter and, for the first time, featured both six airbags and stability control as standard across the range.
And – of course – permanent all-wheel drive was standard across the range – giving the Japanese small car a unique selling point.
Wrapped in a more conservative new bodyshell claimed to be significantly more rigid, the Mk3 Impreza hatch rode on a 95mm-longer wheelbase (2620mm) and was 10mm higher (1475mm) and 45mm wider (1740mm), but 50mm shorter overall at 4415mm. It also weighed around 50kg less than previously.
According to Subaru, it liberated more space, while wider-opening rear doors improved in/egress, extended seat cushions offered more comfort for all passengers and an extra three degrees of seatback recline (to 26 degrees) improved rear-seat comfort.
Subaru said “vast improvements” had been made in terms of noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) thanks to the stiffer bodyshell, which was due in part to the fitment of framed door windows for the first time.
Manual versions were fitted with the convenient Hill Start Assist function (which worked in both reverse and forward gears), while all cars received a tilt/reach steering wheel, gas bonnet struts and an engine set 10mm lower in the chassis, while at the rear a new Liberty-sourced double wishbone suspension made the boot 123mm wider and improved handling.
Until the four-door sedan arrived, the range comprised four hatch variants, opening with the base Impreza R that replaced the Impreza 2.0i. Next up the RX replaced the Impreza RV while the RS replaced the 2.0R.
The turbo Impreza WRX was topped by the STi performance hero.
All non-turbo models were powered by an upgraded version of Subaru’s naturally-aspirated double overhead camshaft 2.0-litre horizontally-opposed four-cylinder boxer engine with Active Valve Control System.
It delivered 20 per cent more power (a healthy 110kW at 6400rpm) and seven per cent more torque (196Nm at 3200rpm) than the SOHC four-cylinder engine it replaced.
Standard across the range were twin front, front-side and full-length side-curtain head airbags, ESC, anti-lock brakes with electronic brakeforce distribution and brake assist, ventilated front and solid rear brake discs, five three-point seatbelts, front seatbelt pretensioners, load-limiters, height-adjusters and light indicators, five head restraints and rear child locks. Wheel sizes increased from 15 to 16-inch.
Meanwhile, the WRX was powered by a massaged version of the old model’s 2.5-litre turbocharged DOHC boxer four that delivered the same 169kW at 5200rpm and 320Nm of torque, but this time 800rpm lower at 2800rpm.
The Impreza WRX STi performance flagship hatch hit showrooms in early 2008. Two versions were offered, with the premium version badged STi Spec.R.
With 221kW at 6000rpm available and peak torque of 407Nm at 4000rpm (up from 392Nm), the new STi was the first production Subaru to officially produce more than 206kW, the self-imposed limit set by Japanese manufacturers.
Compared with the WRX, it featured a unique front bumper with large foglights and a specific rear bumper comprising a large aerodynamic diffuser. It also had a hatch-mounted spoiler more subtle that the previous STi’s massive boot-lid spoiler.
The flagship Spec.R featured lightweight BBS alloy wheels and Recaro sports seats. Cloaking the new model’s longer wheelbase and wider wheels were aggressively blistered wheel-arches on a bodyshell that shared only the bonnet, front doors, roof and rear hatch in common with the WRX, and which appeared largely unchanged in the World Rally Championship.
In September 2010 Subaru overhauled its turbo Impreza range, bringing WRX and the WRX STI closer while making them both more easily differentiated from the non-turbo Imprezas.
The wide body of the previous STI hatch became shared with the cheaper WRX, while a new wide-body sedan was introduced as both a WRX and an STI. The STI sedan was fitted with whas Subaru described as a ‘massive’ boot-mounted spoiler while the WRX sedan got a more sedate boot-lid spoiler.
Engines are unchanged except in the case of the STI, which got a revised torque map.
Subaru also took the opportunity to improve the suspension set-up of the STI after testing spring and damper rates in Australian conditions.
The suspension was 5mm lower, the spring rate increased, the damping revised and thicker front and rear stabiliser bars fitted.

Subaru Impreza (Mk4 Impreza)

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Subaru’s fourth-generation Impreza hatch and sedan received the option of an efficiency-enhancing continuously-variable transmission (CVT) with paddle-shifters to simulate six stepped ratios, replacing the outmoded four-speed auto of its predecessor.
Other efficiency measures included a redesigned 2.0-litre ‘boxer’ four-cylinder petrol engine with an identical 110kW/196Nm power and torque output to the outgoing model, idle-stop technology and improved aerodynamics.
The upshot was a claimed 22 per cent fuel saving for the CVT-equipped variants, down to a combined-cycle fuel consumption figure of 6.8 litres per 100 kilometres while six-speed manual variants consumed 7.1L/100km.
Efficiency gains, which placed the small Subaru ahead many of its rivals, did not come at the expense of the brand’s trademark symmetrical all-wheel-drive layout making the improvements all the more impressive given the weight and friction penalties associated with such systems.
One of the main technology highlights is a new multi-function display, which on entry-level models provided the driver with fuel efficiency information including how many minutes of engine running time have been saved by the idle-stop system.
On up-spec L and S models, a premium unit enabled the driver to compare the fuel efficiency of each journey including how much fuel was saved by the use of idle-stop and unless the optional satellite navigation unit was installed, it also displayed the reversing camera image.
Having received a five-star ANCAP rating, standard safety equipment included seven airbags, front seatbelt pre-tensioners and load-limiters, anti-lock brakes with electronic brake force distribution and brake assist, electronic stability control, all-wheel drive and a hill holder (manual variants only).
All variants came with climate control, cruise control, six-speaker CD sound system with iPod, Bluetooth and USB connectivity, a height-adjustable driver’s seat, height and reach steering wheel adjustment and two interior 12-volt power outlets.
The base model came with 16-inch steel wheels while the mid-range L variant got 16-inch alloys plus dual-zone climate control, leather-trimmed steering wheel and gear shifter, a reversing camera, front centre armrest, front fog lights and rear privacy glass.
The top-spec S added 17-inch alloys, upgraded upholstery and sporty aluminium pedals plus external embellishments including door mirror-mounted indicators, chrome brightwork and side skirts.
Luggage capacity remained on the small size compared with rivals at 340 litres for the hatch and 460 litres for the sedan.

SUBARU Impreza 2.5 (WRX) (2005 – 2007)

0


The first Subaru Impreza was officially introduced in 1993 but the production of the car is still continued this year. More important, the Impresa has always been praised for its features, managing to beat the competition in multiple areas. For example, unlike its rivals, including here the Toyota Corolla, the Honda Civic, the Nissan Sentra, the Mitsubishi Lancer and the Mazda 323, Subaru’s model came with an all wheel drive which improved the car’s capabilities a lot

Cylinders
B4
Displacement
2457 cm3
Power
169 KW @ 5600 RPM
230 HP @ 5600 RPM
227 BHP @ 5600 RPM
Torque
236 lb-ft @ 3600 RPM
320 Nm @ 3600 RPM
Fuel System
Multipoint Injection
Fuel
Petrol
CO2 Emissions
244 g/km
performance
Top Speed
143 mphOR230 km/h
Acceleration 0-62 Mph (0-100 kph)
5.9 s
fuel consumption
City
16.3 mpg USOR14.4 L/100Km
Highway
29.8 mpg USOR7.9 L/100Km
Combined
22.8 mpg USOR10.3 L/100Km
transmission
Drive Type
All Wheel Drive
Gearbox
Manual, 5 Speed
brakes
Front
Ventilated Discs
Rear
Ventilated Discs
tires
Tire Size
215/45 R17
dimensions
Length
175.8 inOR4465 mm
Width
68.5 inOR1740 mm
Height
56.7 inOR1440 mm
Front/rear Track
58.5/58.3 inOR1,486/1,481 mm
Wheelbase
99.4 inOR2525 mm
Ground Clearance
6.1 inOR155 mm
Cargo Volume
14.2 cuFTOR402 L
Cd
0.33
weight
Unladen Weight
3042.4 lbsOR1380 kg
Gross Weight Limit
4100.6 lbsOR1860 kg

911 Carrera Cabriolet

1


257 kW (350 hp) at 7,400
rpm
Top speed: 286 km/h (178
mph)
0-100 km/h (62 mph) in 5.0
s
Combined: 9.2 l/100 km
(30.7 mpg)*
CO2 emissions: 217 g/km*
GBP 79,947.00 incl.
VAT
Identity 911
Our own engineering
tradition is evident from the
‘Dr. Ing. ’ in our company
name. Also from our racing
victories, now totalling
more than 30,000. Not just
feats of heroism any
longer, but responsibility
for the future of the sports
car and for the
environment. Then there is
the 911’s reputation as an
iconic sports car. However,
this reputation means
nothing unless we continue
to breathe new life into old
ideas.
More
Engineering 911
The engines, as you would
expect, are characterised
by six horizontally opposed
cylinders. The 3.4-litre
engine in the 911 Carrera
models produces 257 kW
(350 hp) ; in the 911
Carrera S models, the 3.8-
litre engine develops 294
kW (400 hp). All variants
are equipped with direct
fuel injection (DFI) and
VarioCam Plus for
increased power and
comparatively low fuel
consumption.
-Exterior design
To show you what we
mean, we should start by
looking at the car’s
exterior. The longer
wheelbase of the 911
improves driving stability
and cornering dynamics.
Overhangs are short at the
front and rear, making the
911 look even more
compact and agile.
-Interior design
At Porsche, we don’t build
everyday sports cars, we
build sports cars for
everyday use. How? By
understanding that great
agility and maximum comfort
are not mutually exclusive
but are, in fact, aspects of
a harmonious overall
concept.

Ford software maximizes hybrid efficiency System uses GPS data to find favorite locations

1,413

advertising

will use a littleFord
navigation wizardry on two
of its hybrids: the C-Max
Energi plug-in and
Fusion.
The system will use GPS
data and an algorithm to
predict when a driver is
close frequented
destinations. The car will
adjust powertrain controls
to maximize efficiency.Ford
calls the feature EV+, which
is part of SmartGauge,
standard on the Fusion
Energi and C-Max Energi
plug-ins and on hybrid
models.
“We know from our
research that hybrid
drivers want to drive as
often as they can in
electric-only mode,
especially near their home
or frequently visited
locations,” said Kevin
Layden, Ford director of
electrification programs and
engineering.
The system, developed by
Ford employees Ken
Frederick and Matt Smith, is
in the process of being
patented.EV+ learns the
latitude and longitude of
frequent stops and can
switch the car into electric-
only mode when nearing
home or work.The feature
can be disabled with a
button.
When the car gets within a
radius of about 1/8 mile of a
frequent stop, the EV+ sign
lights up on the dash, and
the driver can silently coast
to the destination.
The original plan was for
the system to collect all the
data and change the car’s
performance based on
location. The team
discovered that it would
take too much hardware and
software, and would demand
too many resources from
the vehicle. Smith and
Frederick developed a way
to do the same thing using
only GPS data.
“We realized that
harnessing data already
available was the way we
could achieve our goal of
improving the entire hybrid
vehicle driving experience,”
said Frederick. “Once we
had access to the data, we
applied machine learning
principles to predict
frequently visited locations
that would determine what
powertrain controls should
be applied to achieve our
goal.”

Toyota Gt-86

45

We first drove Toyota’s GT 86 on a racetrack in Japan, but that was inconclusive, aswe never got out of third gear. Now we have a better picture, a picture that extends all the way to fourth, fifth and even sixth gears. Lucky us.
And we’re closer to home now as well, at the Jarama racetrack near Madrid. Still aclosed circuit though, so still no real road driving impressions which is frustrating, but if this thing disappoints on the road I’m prepared to munch on important bits of my own anatomy. Because it’s really, really good.
So how different is it to its twin sister, the Subaru BRZ? I spent a whole day in the BRZ at Subaru’s test track late last year , so this is where you expect me to say no, to say there are small but definable differences between the Subaru and Toyota. Possibly while scratching my chin and looking thoughtful. But there aren’t.
Well, there are supposed to be. Toyota’s chief engineer on the GT 86, Tetsuya Tada-san tells me there are tiny changes in the spring and damper settings, and in a chin-scratching phase while on track I thought the GT felt marginally softer. But that could simply have been down to the fact the tyres and brakes were cooked after some Swiss hotfoot hadbeen pummelling it five minutes earlier.
In essence they’re identical, and identically excellent. TheGT 86 is light on its feet, notdainty exactly, but super accurate and so well balanced. I know it’s not especially relevant, but the ease with which this thing lets go at the back end is sorefreshing, and even when not arsing about it’s just a joyful thing.
Tada-san told me there were three key elements to the car for him, things he (together with his opposite number at Subaru, Toshio Masuda) had to fight for tooth and nail. One was to steer clear of turbocharging,the second was that it should be rear-wheel drive and the final one was to use narrow tyres. I love that. And it’s not just that the 215/45 R17’s aren’t oversized, it’s that they’re not a sports tyre either. They’re Michelin Primacys forheaven’s sake – as fitted to the Prius.
So they flex a bit, squeal a lot and aren’t too grippy. Tada-san is emphatic that lap times don’t matter here, what matters is if the driver gets out with a smile on his face. I am in complete agreement. Yes, it’s nice to boast to your mates that your car beats theirs aroundthe ‘Ring, but wouldn’t you rather drive a road car that’s actually been set-up to drive properly on the road, not the track? I would.
Toyota is maintaining the façade that these are still prototypes, but Tada-san told me that just applies to the interior fixtures and fittings and that the dynamics are finalised. Great, because off the top ofmy head I can’t think of any car that handles more sweetly than this. And it’s not slow either. On the main straight at Jarama it hit an indicated 125mph and that flat four engine, red-lined at7,500rpm, pulls with gusto atthe top end. Bit limp lower down, but that’s a small priceto pay. Great gearbox and lovely, lovely brakes, too.
The price isn’t yet finalised due to the yen exchange rate, but Toyota is homing inon £25,000 as the target. Rivals are cited as the Scirocco and Peugeot RCZ, but in truth neither can hold a candle to the GT 86 on the road. Enjoy driving? Then this contest boils down to a battle between this and the Subaru – and you’ll make your choice on grounds of badge, dealer location, price and visual tweakery. Me? I’d have the Subaru – the brandis that wee bit cooler – but honestly, this goes down as the best Toyota I’ve ever driven, and one of the best driving sports cars of the last decade. It’s here in June.You know what to do.
Ollie Marriage
The numbers:
1998cc, Flat four, 200bhp, 151lb ft, c160g/km, c42mpg, c6.8secs, c145mph, 1220kg
The cost:
£25,000
The Verdict:
We love the Subaru BRZ. Now we love the Toyota GT 86. One of the very best sports cars around today.
Gt 86Toyota Gt 86Toyota Gt 86