2013 Porsche 911 Carrera S Coupe




The S is the top performing
rear-wheel-drive iteration
of the iconic 911 Carrera
model, that is, before
things get really intense
with Porsche’s GT3 and GT2
versions. The latest 911
Carrera S mirrors the
styling changes found
throughout the rest of the
911 lineup, from the entry-
level Coupe to the
Convertibles, which are
subtle but notable in a
model with a design that
changes at a somewhat
glacial pace.
For starters, the length of
the wheelbase has been
extended by a noteworthy
3.9 inches, while the roof
was slightly lowered for a
sportier overall stance.
Underneath, Porsche fitted
aggressively sized 20-inch
wheels in a variety of new
styles based on the
packages and options
chosen.


An aerodynamically-focused
adjustment was applied to
the side mirrors, moving
them to the upper edge of
the door for less
resistance. The front fascia
is likely the most familiar
compared to the outgoing
model, although tweaks can
be found to the dimensions
and lines throughout.
Step around to the back,
however, and it should be
quite apparent that an
entirely new design scheme
has been applied, with the
sleek and modern tail lamps
taking center stage as the
most eye-grabbing feature
of the tail. Of course, the
bumper has been totally
reshaped as well, sporting
a sweeping and gentle
curve at the waist line, but
then forming a crisp crease
along the lower half, just
above the exhaust.
Of course, the changes are
far more than skin deep.
The body of the new 911 is
made from an aluminum-
steel construction,
providing for as much as
99 pounds of weight
reduction compared to the
outgoing model. Despite
being lighter, Porsche says
the new body offers
“significantly greater
rigidity” as well.
Delving inside the 911
Carrera S’s changes –
literally – will reveal a new
interior that Porsche says
was largely modeled from
the Carrera GT supercar
(though it also bears a
striking resemblance to the
Panamera sedan). The
cockpit is now more driver-
focused, featuring a center
console that rises up
towards the front with the
gear shifter or selector
closer to the steering
wheel. Not all interior
details are new, however,
as Porsche stuck with a
traditional five round gauge
cluster arrangement, with
one gauge being a high-
resolution multifunction
screen.
The Power of a
Porsche
Under the rear deck lid
resides a 3.8-liter flat-six
that produces 400
horsepower and 325 lb-ft
of torque, up from 350
ponies and 287 lb-ft in the
standard 911 Carerra.
Sending that power to the
rear wheels is a standard
(and world-first) seven-
speed manual transmission
with an extra-tall top gear
for quieter and more
economical highway
cruising, while a seven-
speed PDK (Porsche-speak
for a dual-clutch paddle-
shifted gearbox) is
available as an extra-cost
option.
Porsche says that the 911
Carrera S is capable of a
4.3 second sprint from
zero-to-sixty when
equipped with the PDK,
while an optional Sport
Chrono package cuts that
time down to 4.1 seconds.
Porsche’s factory
acceleration estimates are
widely regarded as
conservative, however, so
don’t be surprised to find
that real-world sprints
occur a few ticks quicker
than claimed.
All that performance doesn’t
come at the expense of fuel
economy: Porsche claims
that the latest 911 Carrera
S is 16 percent more
efficient than the outgoing
model while also producing
16 percent fewer carbon
emissions. Officially, the car
is rated at 19/27 mpg with
the manual gearbox and
20/27 with the PDK. The
environmental gains are
attributable to the use of
automatic engine start/stop
technology, thermal
management, electrical
system recuperation, the
highly ratio-endowed
gearboxes as well as new
electro-mechanical power
steering with improved
efficiency.
The 911 Carrera S isn’t
just focused on efficiency
and straight-line
acceleration, of course.
Porsche Dynamic Chassis
Control (PDCC) active roll
stabilization system,
available for the first time
on the 911 Carrera S,
reduces lateral inclination
when cornering by allowing
the tires to always be in
the optimal position relative
to the road surface,
allowing the car to sustain
higher lateral forces.
Optional Features
As with other Porsches, the
911 Carrera S can be had
with a nearly infinite
variety of optional features
and packages – for a price.
Inside, four different types
of seats can be had, while
buyers can also spec
aluminum, wood, carbon
fiber or alcantara trim.
Audiophiles can choose
between Bose or Burmester
sound systems, the latter
with 821 watts of crisp-
sounding output.

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