TRUTH ABOUT ILLUMINATI-PART 2


Freemasons considered
it
to be an undesirable
movement because it
eventually proved to
be purely political and
of a destructive rather
than constructive
nature. It never had
any connection with the
Illuminati of
Rosicrucianism and no
connection with any
part of Freemasonry
despite the claims that
were made for it. It is
only another illustration
of
how the good name
of some other
organization can be
wrongly adopted.
Adam Weishaupt in
Bavaria
Adam Weishaupt (1748
– 1830) was a Bavarian
professor
of law at
Ingolstadt University in
Germany, and a former
Jesuit. On May 1, 1776
he founded an
organization that he
named the “Illuminati”
and recruited the first
brothers from among
his students. This
order, originally called
the Society of
Perfectibilists, was
divided into an intricate
system of graded
classes and degrees of
initiation. Members
observed strict oaths
of secrecy and
obedience to superiors,
with secret
confessions
and mutual
surveillance.
Like the Jesuits, the
Illuminati brotherhood
was run on military
lines. Members were
requested to surrender
individual judgment
and
will. Like earlier secret
societies, Weishaupt’s
Illuminati promised to
reveal an ancient
wisdom. Higher and
more powerful secrets
were promised to those
who progressed up the
ladder of initiations.
Initiates worked in small
cells.
Knowledge was
shared between cells
on what modern
security services call a
“need to know” basis.
The members were told
that this was because
this newly re-
discovered knowledge
was so dangerous.
Weishaupt joined the
Freemasons in 1777,
and soon many of the
Illuminati followed,
infiltrating the
Freemasonry Lodges.
They quickly rose to
positions of seniority.
From a description of
the rituals and
ceremonies of
Weishaupt’s Illuminati
organization, it is
evident that every
feature and every
phrase of the ritual and
instructions
is so
entirely different from
anything found in
Freemasonry, or in
Rosicrucian work, that
there can be no
mistake in associating
the two.
In 1785 Bavarian
authorities seized
Illuminati writings which
revealed that the
ancient secret wisdom
and the secret
supernatural powers
promulgated within the
Illuminati had always
been a cynical
invention and a fraud.
An aspirant progressed
through
the grades
only to discover that
the spiritual element in
the teachings were
merely a smokescreen.
Spirituality was
derided, spat upon.
Jesus Christ’s
teachings, it was said,
were really purely
political in content,
calling for the abolition
of all property, of the
institution of marriage
and all family ties, all
religion.
Finally it was whispered
in
the candidate’s ear
that the ultimate secret
was that there was no
secret. In this way he
was inducted into a
nihilistic and anarchistic
philosophy that
appealed to the
candidate’s worst
instincts. Weishaupt
gleefully anticipated
tearing down,
destroying civilization,
not to set people free,
but for the pleasure of
imposing his will upon
others.
Weishaupt’s writings
reveal the extent of
his cynicism: ” . . . in
concealment lies a
great part of our
strength. For this
reason we must cover
ourselves in the name
of another society. The
lodges that are under
Freemasonry are the
most suitable cloak for
our high purpose.”
Following the discovery
of these writings, the
order was suppressed
– but too late.
The aim of Weishaupt
and his co-
conspirators was to set
up
a society run on
purely materialistic
grounds, a
revolutionary new
society – and the place
where they would test
their theories, they had
decided,
would be
France. By 1789 there
were some three
hundred lodges in
France, including sixty-
five
in Paris. According
to some French
Freemasons today,
there were more than
seventy thousand
Freemasons in France.
The original plan — as
inspired by Saint
Germain — had been to
uplift the French people
with Hope and the will
for change, but the
lodges had been
infiltrated to the extent
that it has been said
that “the program put
into action by the
French Constitutional
Assembly in 1789 had
been put together by
German Illuminati in
1776.” Danton,
Desmoulins, Mirabeau,
Marat, Robespierre,
Guillotin and other
leaders had been
“illumined” by
Weishaupt’s infiltrators.
When the king was
slow to agree to
further reforms,
Desmoulins called for
an armed uprising.
Then, in June 1789,
Louis XVI tried to
disperse the Assembly
and called his troops to
Versailles. Mass
desertions followed. On
July 14, 1789 an angry
mob stormed the
Bastille. Louis XVI was
executed with the
guillotine in January
1793.
In the anarchy that
followed, France was
threatened from within
and without. The
leaders of the
Freemasonry lodges
took control. Soon many
of
their number were
accused of being
traitors to the
Revolution – and so
began the Terror.
At its height, the
Illuminati operated
throughout a wide area
of Europe. It is said
that Weishaupt’s real
aim — hidden from
novices at the outer
rings of his group —
was to replace
Christianity with the
worship of reason and
to establish a world
government through
which the Illuminati
would rule the world.
The group was
outlawed by edict of the
Bavarian
government
in 1785. The bad
reputation of
Weishaupt’s Illuminati
unfairly tarnished
popular opinions of
Freemasons in general.
“Power Elites” in
the 21st Century
Some authors have
claimed that the
Illuminati have
continued to exist after
1785. Some of today’s
so-called “power
elites” have used the
“Illuminati” name as a
modern day
smokescreen. However,
that
should not cause
us to lose sight of the
true purposes of
Freemasonry. Do not
fall into the trap of
blaming the
Freemasons and the
extinct Illuminati. That’s
what the “power elite”
want us to do.

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